Monday, February 20, 2017

Enthusiastic Review for Make, Learn, Succeed: Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School

From Getting Smart (blog...)
"Smart Review | Make, Learn, Succeed: Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School"

Do you consider yourself a creative person?
When I ask students this question, particularly adult learners, nearly everyone answers very decisively.

The existing paradigm–which is slowly being eroded by research–is that you either are creative, or you are not.

I remember this from my own childhood very well. My next door neighbor’s mom was super “creative,” in that she was what I now call “crafty.” My own mom would always shake her head and say that she just wasn’t that “type of person.” Disheartened, I remember thinking that I felt creative, but what if it was somehow genetic? Would I turn into an uninspired adult one day? As you can imagine, this scenario plays out all the time in classrooms across the country, as teachers face students who have predetermined if they are creative or not, based largely on the cues the adults around them provide.

Can Creativity and Critical Thinking Co-Exist?

Through the years in my Project Based Learning classroom, I’ve struggled to convince students that they could be creative, especially in a testing obsessed school culture. I’ve sometimes doubted my proclivity towards creative endeavors as opposed to more nuts and bolts academic curriculum, but I always come around to the same conclusion, aptly explained by Mark Gura, the author of Make, Learn, Succeed: Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School: “Effective learning challenges, by the way, are very often those intended to push the envelope of student understanding and ability.”

Creative work is intellectually stimulating, and with appropriate direction can result in the highest order of critical thinking.

The trick, of course, is to allow your own creativity into the room, providing a model for students who, like my younger self, might not see creative expression at home.


Published by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), the book’s 210 pages are conversational and inviting, much like talking with a favorite former professor. This tone is quite fitting given that Gura’s career in education has spanned three decades and includes classroom teaching, administration and currently includes online higher education graduate classes. If you are looking for a mentor then this book will speak to you as it did to me. I felt, more than anything, validated that my “hunch” that creativity is a 21st Century Skill. Additionally, I realized pretty quickly that the work I do in what I consider a creative classroom is actually just the tip of a very big iceberg.

Real Teachers, Real Reflection

This book reflects the vast experiences of its author, allowing the reader a wide lens perspective on a topic that is very difficult to truly see and understand. What separates this book from others I’ve read is that it is structured in a way that allows the reader an almost cinematic view of the topic. Gura systematically provides a wide view lens concerning the biggies like “What is Creativity… And Can It Be Taught?” and “From Creativity to Innovation and Problem Solving,” and then zooms in to capture the details teachers want to know. He does this very effectively through interviews with real, in the field practicing teachers who are able to pinpoint the concerns that impact creativity in the classroom.


Perhaps my favorite of the interviews is with Tim Needles, a visual arts teacher and blogger. One of the difficulties of students being “creative” is how to also teach students content through the process. He explains, “If you challenge students to be creative directly, they may freeze up. But ironically, I find that some of the best students in the class are the most intimidated at the idea of being required to be creative.” This is not the only place in the book where Gura captures the pedagogical and practical considerations; additionally, he provides specific, ready to use examples and strategies which push students to be creative, but the methodologies he shares are academically sound and take the pressure off the child.


Another aspect of the book that is really enjoyable is also a reflection of Gura’s vast experience; he moves between stories about Archimedes “eureka” moments to the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow website, to referencing a YouTube video of Adele talking about creativity. As a mom and creative person, I look forward to chasing down Gura’s references and digging even deeper into this topic. As a teacher, this is a book that I will revisit over the summer with my curriculum in hand. I’m confident that incorporating some of the ideas will lead to an enhanced culture of creativity, and as I begin Project-Based Learning, I’ll alter my approach to introducing the topic of creativity

Anyone Can Be Creative

If you answered decisively when you answered the question “Are you creative?” then this book is for you, no matter how you answered. You’ll learn that the answer to that question isn’t dependent on genetics or some special calling, but instead an exciting possibility for anyone, even if you answered no–or rather, especially if you answered no."

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Develop student creativity with this new resource



ISTE Update


Develop student creativity with this new resource.
ISTE Resources Creativity is a 21st century skill that today's experts say can be taught and assessed. While many educators have the tools they need to teach content, developing student creativity may be unfamiliar.

In the soon-to-be-released ISTE book Make, Learn, Succeed: Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School, author Mark Gura shows that creativity can be developed in students and, with the integration of ed tech, that doing so is both practical and effective.

Learn how to encourage students to evolve and develop as creative individuals by integrating project-based learning, robotics and STEAM and gaming into instruction.


For more info and to order, click...

Literacy and Creativity: Essential Skills for 21st Century Students

Spring 2017 ISTE Professional Learning Series

The Recording of this Session and the slides that were presented are now available (links below)


Presented by Mark Gura and Evelyn Wassel (2/15/2017)

Discover approaches for making creativity an instructional goal and learn more about the connection between creativity and literacy. We’ll share examples of activities, projects and technology resources. We’ll answer your questions and suggest ways you can learn more.

For the session recording:   http://iste.adobeconnect.com/p3rhjw925qg/ 
.
For the slides: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5tUrttFWf7iejFQWEVpZ0RLWE0/view 

 
The ISTE Professional Learning Series  upcoming offerings

Make, Learn, Succeed Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School

Make, Learn, Succeed Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School
Develop Student Creativity - Topics: Curriculum, Robotics, STEM, Project-based learning, Personalized learning, Maker movement (click on cover image for more information)

Developing Student Creativty: Make ‘mistakes’ part of the creative process

FROM:ISTE Connects 2/10/2017 

Make ‘mistakes’ part of the creative process


The phrase “everyone makes mistakes” has a unique meaning for retired educator and ISTE author
Mark Gura.
Rather than just a cliche, he see it as an entry point for bringing creativity, and a new way of thinking, to literacy lessons.

“Mistakes are a valuable tool, rather than something to be avoided," Gura says. "They should be celebrated and folded into the learning process.”

In the bigger picture, this different way of thinking about mistakes will also help teachers bolster a culture of creativity in classrooms.
One way to do that is to turn a string of assignments into one cohesive project, with a beginning and an end. That appeals to students more than “an endless parade of activities,” Gura says.

Here’s what a poetry project might look like:
Gathering feedback. As students write their poems, have them seek advice from classmates. “In a classroom with a strong culture of accepting mistakes, we can share our work with others and rely on them to provide feedback,” Gura says.

Reflecting. Ask students to journal about their poem and write a formal assessment where they identify areas of improvement. For instance, they might explain that they are not happy with the overall direction or a certain portion of the poem.

Rewriting. After journaling and reflecting, students can return to their poem and rewrite it based on feedback from classmates and their reflections in their journals.

Gura suggests students create several versions of the poem, saving all versions so that “the creative options are visible, able to spark further ideas and able to be manipulated.”

Presenting. Students present their finished poems to an audience. “The wonderful thing is that this can be an ongoing circle of readers, writers, creators and collaborators,” Gura says. “Creativity is a process-oriented phenomenon. We’re not just dropping seeds and sprinkling them. We can scaffold this for students, showing them a process-oriented approach.”...

Read the full article at its source: https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=904&category=In-the-classroom&article=

Make, Learn, Succeed Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School

Make, Learn, Succeed Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School
Develop Student Creativity - Topics: Curriculum, Robotics, STEM, Project-based learning, Personalized learning, Maker movement (click on cover image for more information)

Friday, February 10, 2017

Maker Resources Rule!

Originally published in EdTech Digest
https://edtechdigest.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/maker-resources-rule/ 

Maker Resources Rule!

A report from the 2017 FETC exhibition hall.
GUEST COLUMN | by Mark Gura
CREDIT FETC 2017.jpg

Like one of
those all-powerful entities from Sci-Fi movies of the past, sometimes a monster edtech trend appears spontaneously, coalescing from a collection of basic elements and just waiting for a chance to challenge the status quo. Or so it seemed to me as I viewed a very impressive body of Maker-learning resources found throughout the recent 2017 FETC Expo in Orlando. As I explored the exhibitor floor, it became clear that all the exciting maker stuff there was coalescing into an edtech juggernaut, one that will continue to make a major impact in the character of learning.

It is up to the teacher and his or her understanding of creative processes and how to foster and spark student creativity that makes the greatest impact on whether or not Maker-based Learning experiences will be the very rich and hyper-relevant instruction that today’s students need.

When one considers the bountiful body of available Maker resources and what they make possible for today’s students, what comes into focus is a very uplifting vision of a transformed school experience. And, as things displayed at this year’s FETC attest, it’s a vision that’s good-to-go right now. Truly, there’s a very impressive body of affordable and practically implementable things waiting to make the concept of Maker-based Learning come alive in our schools.

There were too many items on the floor to describe them all here. And in fact, some, like the Little Bits electronic construction kits and the Makerbot 3D Printer are already well known, popular, and making a difference in the sort of learning experience schools now offer.
What follows here though, are some resources and the important ideas behind them I came across that I think are truly worth making note of and that I think readers would do well to follow up on, consider acquiring and putting them to good purpose in classrooms.


Tinker Table
As I wandered the exhibit floor, I was attracted to the buzz of excited, joyful activity at a ‘Tinker Table’ where dozens of teachers took advantage of mountains of freely offered supplies to spontaneously create items powered by miniature electronic components. This hub of inspiration powerfully demonstrated the potential Maker Resources represent to breathe fresh life into teaching and learning. The Tinker Table was part of the display area of United Data Technologies (UDT). Chief Technology Officer Danny Rodriguez explained to me that UDT provides an array of Maker oriented tech resources to schools, helping them select appropriate and effective resources and supporting them in managing and implementing them. My takeaway? Maker-based Learning can provide excitement and spontaneous expression-fueled learning – it offers high student engagement driven by opportunities for discovery, reflection, and hands-on learning in action. It was great to see a large gaggle of teachers modeling and living all this at the very center of the exhibit.


Meaningful Making
For me, a crucial issue in the whole Maker-based Learning conversation has to do with the goals and hoped for outcomes of Maker experiences in our schools. Above all, while we do want schools to adopt this approach, we want them to do it for the right reasons, hopefully even discover some reasons of their own that are consistent with and extend their understanding and commitment to 21st-century learning. What I mean is, good reasons for supporting students in making things with the components and resources we provide them, reasons that reflect another stage in achieving meaningful learning and not simply adopt Making as an attempt to stay in step with something that’s currently all-the-buzz—without aligning these au courant efforts to our highest educational goals and aspirations.


A further key question is, as Makers, do we want students to simply follow directions to replicate creations that others before them have already designed and proven can be assembled from parts provided? Or, do we want to them to shift their focus to the way humans meet their needs with machines, devices, and constructed inventions; identify and address a need on their own, and go through the rich, enlightening process of conceiving, prototyping, and refining creations of their own design?


And yes, there certainly is much value to be had from the former, there’s a good deal of math and science involved and making things is, indeed, a very good way to learn them. The second approach, though, the one in which deep understanding of the phenomenon of technology is understood, and student creativity is sparked, unleashed, focused and learned is so much more of what today’s kids truly need.


The good news is that, to one degree or another, pretty much all of the Maker resources that I reviewed and explored at the expo provide the opportunity for both sides of this equation, obviously some more than others. I walked away, more than ever though, understanding that so often it is up to the teacher and his or her understanding of creative processes and how to foster and spark student creativity that makes the greatest impact on whether or not Maker-based Learning experiences will be the very rich and hyper-relevant instruction that today’s students need.


Electronics Kits
When they think of Making, many conjure up images of circuits, processers, power units, connected lights, motors, probes, and the like. These were offered in the highly usable format of kits made fully ready and accessible for students. I saw several of these highly worthy of mention. In fact despite my jaded sensibilities, the result of years of reviewing edtech resources, I found myself broadly smiling, even on the verge of cheering at just how right some of their providers had gotten them.


A few I’d like to mention are:
The soon-to-be-released Microduino kit offers components that are neatly stackable and that adhere to one another magnetically. Very neat and it’s easy to see that these components might be reused endlessly as part of a great many learning projects. The little Arduino processor that the gentleman at the booth showed me was well encased in a plastic frame making it safe to touch, easy to handle, and very easy to integrate into all sorts of machines that student inventors might come up with. I love the magnetic components and plug and unplug electronic cables that obviate other, more difficult and potentially hazardous ways of connecting components.


I fell in love with Sparkfun’s new Lillypad Sewable Electronics Kit right away. This kit’s cover shows a photo of a small group of young girls working on technology projects together. Seems to me to be (importantly) girl oriented, we need to encourage girls to take ownership of technology as their natural instincts and passions may dictate. Along with the now well known, Makey Makey and others, this kit was featured at the Sparkfun booth, nicely broadening the array of wonderful possibilities that the Maker Niche offers learners in need of hands-on, minds-on engagement.


The Piper kit got a big smile from me when I came across it at the booth. Kids construct a computer from its essential components and elements, including a cool looking wooden case that houses the computer and the parts and tools with which it is constructed. According to the rep manning the booth, as soon as students get enough assembled so that the small display is activated, the computer itself provides video instruction on how to build it out further until it is complete and does much of what one would expect from any computer these days. This could help a school establish a great segment of a technology education program. I was left wondering though about open-ended projects that students might do beyond creating the computer.


3D Printers
MakerBot, the first 3D Printer that many of us ever saw or even heard about, was widely represented at the booths of several re-sellers as well as at its own. This item bridges the gap between learning about making things, and actually making them. Currently, manufacturing involves the use of computer technology to aid in the research, design, and in the actual fabrication of so much. Computers drive robots and machines of all types. MakerBot paved the way, or at least a good part of it, with its affordable, easy to comprehend and use 3D Printer. Anyone still not aware of these wonderful little devices and their history and significance should check out the (YouTube available) video Print the Legend t which explores the growth of the 3D printing industry, with focus on Startup companies like MakerBot.


In a related vein, what I found remarkable at AP Lazer’s booth is that they were showing a commercial grade, industrial laser engraving machine. I chatted with one of the reps there who explained that they are just beginning to place these in schools, that is, beyond technical schools where one might reasonably expect to find such things. In fact, I was informed that this company had placed one recently in a middle school. This is really quite something, because following the logic of Maker-based Learning; the advantage is for the student to produce a real ‘something’ in the real world. This item though, elevates this prospect from producing a small plastic thingie that sort of resembles an authentic artifact to something with a very strong presence in the real world. I was shown beautifully etched items with designs laser cut into wood and stone. Some schools just may want to consider this.


Virtual Making
If Maker-based Learning is about creating things, it’s things that kids make as an expression of their focused experimentation and their application of thinking skills. If their making is a response to challenges and issues they identify in the real world as well as those they imagine, then why wouldn’t “Virtual Making” be an effective and exciting part of this?


Actually, the folks at Tynker, a popular resource to support student learning about and applications of Coding, understand that well and have placed on their website an answer to that question:
“Coding is the Language of Creativity – Learning to code at a young age isn’t just about becoming a programmer—coding is a creative outlet, a way to challenge yourself, a collaboration tool, and a new way to interact with your digital world. And that’s exactly what we’ve seen from the Tynker community. Kids are creating incredible games and stories, they’re learning from each other, and they’re pushing themselves to create projects they’re truly proud of.”

This orientation, and things to implement it well with students, was much evident at the Tynker booth.


Making Crosses Over to Robotics
Interestingly, while there were many Maker resource booths to visit, and there was a similar number of robotics resources on exhibit, there were a few that also spoke to the crossover between the two realms of tech-supported learning, an opportunity that I think is important and needs to be expanded.
Sphero is already quite well known for its student robots. Interestingly, these are not in that niche of resources that call for students to construct their own robot. SPHERO is one of those that comes already assembled, encouraging students to learn coding by programming it. At the booth at FETC, though, there was an intriguing interactive exhibit in which a SPHERO robot was used as the power for a more elaborate robot in which it was mounted, thus making it something of an engine. I love clever adaptations of robotics materials like this. I hope to see Sphero expand its line of robots and its applications of them as learning resources. This display pointed out new possibilities and new aspects of technology for student discovery and inspiration, something that, in my mind, was emblematic of the whole of the FETC 2017 Expo.

Mark Gura is an Advisory Board Member and Contributing Editor at EdTech Digest and the author of the recently released book, Make, Learn, Succeed: Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School published by ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education).


Friday, October 28, 2016

The New York City Department of Education / Office of Instructional Technology (Wayback Capture)

WAYBACK Capture 2003
Amazingly, after 13 years some of this still remains up in an obscure corner of the web where things of importance, but long forgotten, are archived and preserved. My staff and I labored long and hard on this, but that was 13 years and a million miles ago...



Teacher Resources
Online PD
Content Area Resources

  Mathematics
  Social Studies
  Science
  Art
  English Language Arts

Classroom Management
Compositions vs. Websites?
IBM Authentic Assessment
Teacher Workshops
Software Suggestions
Software Tutorials
Project Smart Guide
Tech Basics
Creating Video Projects
Tech-to-Go eJournal


Technology Standards and Guides
Standards
Resource Guides
Smart Projects
New! Best Practice Sites created at our Summer Institute!
The Office of Instructional Technology (OIT) offers support in instruction and professional development in the use of computers and related technology in the K-12 classroom. OIT conducts teacher workshops, coordinates city-wide conferences and provides Internet-based resources.
Using the Internet
The Email Center
Online Projects

  Math-Kitecture
  Negotiate for Peace
  New York City Close-Up
  Pictaclues Prose
  World Wide Weather 

School Web Site Checklist
Create a Web Page
Lesson Planning
Internet Basics
Technology Links
New Teacher Links
Top 100 Links
CyberCamp

Updates
OIT Yearbook
Announcements
OIT Newsletter
Share-Outs
Conferences
Quests Unplugged
FLL Robotics
Tech-to-Go 2002
Dealing with 9/11
Approved Vendors
[Updated 10/29/02]

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Travel Summer 2016: Ecuador and Pacific Northwest

Items below as posted in Facebook...

Pacific Northwest

Some photos from our recent jaunt through the Pacific North West: Vancouver, British Columbia -  Banff National Park, Alberta - Glacier National Park, Montana. Travel still gets the blood flowing and the brain cells buzzing :) Nothing like walking on a glacier for the first time :)  Pedestrian suspension bridge hanging on cables 200ft over forested river gorge, was a close 2nd. The good company of congenial,  like-minded folks is icing on the cake.
https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPE88tUvCX3Jr3hFNUp1k6hXXjM4x9Hgzb88R7LlX3pPtoJaJhfh-wzaslet0Ooyw/photo/AF1QipMuM1LMHU2u437YDCJgnAoqGEMjW89y6k-ApUe3?key=WVdiWjQ2NFZNMU5lYzIxR2thOFJOc3duakQ1Wm1n

Click on photo above to launch full photo set >>>
Ecuador

 Recently back from Ecuador – some photos below (click >). Got back shortly before the earthquake in Quito, the capitol. Good timing and I hope all the good folks we saw there are doing fine! This trip turned out to be a relaxing break from the heat of Florida, some pleasurable touring around the countryside, an investigation of the American Ex Pat Community in the city of Cuenca, and an opportunity to spend time with various branches of my wife, Maria’s, family who live in and around Quito. What a gorgeous country: HIGH mountains, blue skies, nature still much in control… all of that alongside a rapidly modernizing, bustling urban environment. So many things to see and wonder and smile at! Gracias to Galli and Carmen (and Delia), Patricio and Cecilia, Ramiro and Loli (and their kids and spouses and grand kids), and Marianella and Juan Carlos for the hospitality and affectionate welcome to their homes

 https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPE88tUvCX3Jr3hFNUp1k6hXXjM4x9Hgzb88R7LlX3pPtoJaJhfh-wzaslet0Ooyw/photo/AF1QipMuM1LMHU2u437YDCJgnAoqGEMjW89y6k-ApUe3?key=WVdiWjQ2NFZNMU5lYzIxR2thOFJOc3duakQ1Wm1n

Thursday, July 14, 2016

High on EdTech in the Mile High City: Guest Collumn by Mark Gura

For the 3rd year in a row... what a privilege to have edtechdigest publish my "Wrap Up" (State of the EdTech Field as it Revealed Itself at the Annual ISTE Conference) article! :)
https://edtechdigest.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/high-on-edtech-in-the-mile-high-city/

High on EdTech in the Mile High City

ISTE 2016 reveals the edtech field to now be significantly maturing, employing sophisticated technologies to provide crowdsourced instructional, assessment, and professional development items for teachers by teachers; rich, easy-to-use content, and dedicated to developing and supporting student creativity. Yeah!

Okay, unpack bag? Check! Wash dirty socks? Check! Sort out all business cards and session handouts? Check! Write my annual piece on what got my heart and mind racing at ISTE? Here we go:
Yes, as its previous incarnations did, ISTE 2016 came through big time on its promise: to deliver more brilliant edtech to understanding-hungry educators packed into a single venue, more next-level thoughts whizzing around one’s head, more wonderful new tech items to ponder and covet, and more reasons and hunches to make an educator feel good about being a teacher at this particular moment in time than any other program or event I can imagine!

It’s not enough just to jump into the digital pool, [solution providers] must be clear about which resources support and establish practices that truly reflect advances in pedagogical concept and theory, and that further offer practical, effective ways to put them into to use with real kids in actual classrooms.

After returning from a previous incarnation of this conference in the not-too-distant past, I wrote about my having collided there with abundant evidence that the field of edtech had split into two realities, two distinct paradigms. One that fully supports the forward thinking, bleeding-edge of progressive teaching and learning as manifested in practices like Project-Based Learning, student online publishing, educational gaming, social media-based class exchanges, and the like. And the other, steeped in and misguidedly dedicated to preserving a 19th-century style, traditional, teacher-centered instruction. In my mind, this variety changes students’ school experience only superficially through the application of a veneer of digitization comprised of things like digital, but traditionally formatted digital textbooks; online summative assessments; and the same old, tired worksheets dressed up with a tad of digital animation.


I think this take on the state-of-the-field of just a year or two ago was pretty much on the money, considering that over the past few months the edtech literature has informed us that the industry dedicated to supporting schools in their digital transformation has reported a savvier customer base; school personnel who are now well aware that it’s not enough just to jump into the digital pool, that they must be clear about which resources support and establish practices that truly reflect advances in pedagogical concept and theory, and that further offer practical, effective ways to put them into to use with real kids in actual classrooms.


I wasn’t at the conference long this year before I began to realize that a still newer reality is now coalescing to redefine the field of Educational Technology, actually the entire field of Education. In the past, edtech was fully embraced primarily by that minority of teachers and schools who confidently understood the shifts in the goals of education that are reflected in progressive frameworks like the ISTE Standards and 21st Century Learning. These were forward thinkers, willing to take on the risks involved in leaving the comfort zone of the known, traditionally-run classrooms model.


At the other end of the spectrum, districts feeling pressure to “integrate technology” were willing to dabble in it, but only so far as they could keep a digitized version of teacher-centered control of traditional curriculum going, and adopting tech resources and practices that would help them accomplish that.


Hitting the Sweet Spot
This year, what I witnessed throughout the conference, is the emergence of a mature sweet spot, an area of informed and sophisticated technology-supported instruction, and importantly, a body of emerging resources to make being part of this phenomenon easy for so many educators out there who currently sense that they need to become part of this transformation. There seems to have evolved a wonderful middle ground comprised of resources and practices that bring the benefits of appropriate personalization, increased student engagement, and progressive pedagogy; things like constructivist-aligned social learning and authentic activities into a comfortably redefined classroom experience.

Read the full article at its source: https://edtechdigest.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/high-on-edtech-in-the-mile-high-city/

Cultivating Creativity: TECHNOLOGY CAN MAKE EVERY CLASSROOM CREATIVE

Wonderful to have been included in "Cultivating creativity" a powerful article in entrsekt magazine (July 2016)...
TECHNOLOGY CAN MAKE EVERY CLASSROOM CREATIVE
Veteran educator and ISTE member Mark Gura of Jupiter, Florida, says "through technology, every classroom can be a creative classroom." Students and teachers can say much more now that there are those wonderful tools to help them say it. It's the democratization of the media, he says - in other words, it's for everyone.

Gura grew up in New York City, where he taught for more than three decades. A prolific
writer, he recently completed his fifth ISTE book, Make, Learn, Succeed: Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School. He also teaches graduate teaching courses online, and as a former teacher of visual arts (among many other subjects) and as a technology director, he says he has been involved in promoting creativity he entire life.

He is convinced that the best place to inspire teachers to be creative is right at the beginning, in our teacher education programs. Classroom teachers need to make developing student creativity a goal.

LIGHT A FIRE
In his own teaching, he sees the power of firsthand joy. 

"The great thing about this is that once a student has had a few experiences like this, the experience of education itself is transformed, as that old saying goes, 'Education is not the filling of a bucket but the lighting of a fire!' What I want people to know about student creativity is that engaging students in activities to develop their creativity is one predictable way to light that fire."

"I've spent a lifetime in pursuit of that, and I think that in the end, it is probably the very most important thing that we educators can do for our students. By using student creativity as a focus, we have  a very clear path to take toward that goal!"


Friday, June 17, 2016

Make, Learn, Succeed: Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School

My latest book...


Make, Learn, Succeed
Building a Culture of Creativity in Your School
Product code: CREATE
ISBN: 9781564843807
Expected publication date: 07/2016
Topics: Curriculum, Robotics, STEM, Project-based learning, Personalized learning, Maker movement

Mark Gura
To adequately prepare students for success, our schools must encourage students to evolve and develop as creative individuals. Today's educators are challenged to establish an instructional practice that will support the development of student creativity, as well as meet curricular goals and assessments.
In this book, author Mark Gura shows that creativity can be developed and that, thanks to the  variety of technology resources available, doing so is not only possible, but practical and effective.
Offering rich examples and ready-to-implement activities, the book describes how to develop creativity by:
  • Establishing a creativity-friendly learning environment.
  • Weaving maker, STEAM, robotics and gaming into instruction.
  • Encouraging motivation, entrepreneurship, curiosity and play.
  • Using technology tools and resources to support student creativity.
Mark Gura has been an educator for more than three decades. He works with Touro College, Fordham University and other organizations to promote the use of technology to provide highly motivating, relevant activities for students. Gura is the author of Getting Started with LEGO Robotics and the editor of Teaching Literacy in the Digital Age.
ORDER & INFO: https://www.iste.org/resources/product?id=3797&name=Make%2c+Learn%2c+Succeed